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2020
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No negative self-talk

Posted by communitymanager Moderator Apr 27, 2020

Negative self-talk can stop you from reaching your goals.  It undermines your self-confidence and often what you tell yourself has a way of becoming reality. In other words, what you tell yourself can support you in achieving your goals, or undermine you.

The good news – there are strategies you can use to talk back to that negative voice in your head, things you can use to flip your thinking to the positive and support you in achieving your goals.

  • Notice negative thoughts when they pop up. Acknowledge them for what they are – just thoughts that you can change if you choose. Writing down your thoughts and flipping them to the positive can help you learn to make the flip more easily.
  • Challenge your thinking. Once you’ve become aware of negative thoughts, begin to challenge them. Ask yourself, are these thoughts really based on truth?  Most likely not. On the off chance they are, ask yourself what you could do to make things different?
  • Use positive statements. Avoid the words “not” and “don’t.” Studies show that your brain doesn’t really grasp the concept of what you are not; it registers what you are. In other words, if you say, “I am not weak,” the brain registers “I am weak.” So instead, be positive and say, “I am strong.”  
  • Use the present tense. State self-talk in the present tense – here and now statements to help you take action. Instead of, “I’ll be better tomorrow,” say, “I am making a choice to be different now.” You may choose to act a different way or feel a different way.  Focus on being different in the moment rather than how you were in the past or will be in the future.
  • Identify what you want to achieve and state it as a fact. Rephrase your statements to see a goal as a reality. Instead of, “I hope to walk three times this week,” say “I am going to walk three times this week.”
  • Focus on behaviors you can control. Use “I” statements. Create positive self-talk that deals with you and your goals. Say, “I am eating healthy foods this week” instead of, “I am losing three pounds this week.” Realize that you cannot control the actions of others, or the outcomes, but you can control the choices you make.

 

 

References

https://coaching.humana.com/Default.aspx?tabid=5383&lid=1025780&reflid=0&cid=a1400c3c-9947-4576-83ca-2aeb6cd8b0e3&cpid=50001&ctid=10074&cgtid=10000&cvtid=1&coachmgr=1&conly=1&nolog=1&cpidv8=50001&id=a1400c3c-9947-4576-83ca-2aeb6cd8b0e3&rwndrnd=0.7149800296928728

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTCS_95.htm

communitymanager

Keep it safe

Posted by communitymanager Moderator Apr 6, 2020

Regular activity is good for all of us, and it’s important to stay safe while becoming more active. Here are some tips for doing so:

·         Talk to a doctor.  Talk to your doctor before engaging in exercise, especially if you haven’t been active recently.  Also consult your doctor if you have any injuries or health conditions, or if you experience any troublesome symptoms during exercise such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness.

·         Pay attention to your body. Start slowly and gradually increase your activity level.  At times you may need to cut back or change your routine.  Physical activity can be challenging, but shouldn’t be painful.

·         Prevent soreness and injury. Take five to 10 minutes to warm up and cool down properly to prevent soreness and injury, and be aware that training too hard or too often can cause overuse injuries.  Shoot for a mix of different kinds of activities that use different muscle groups, and make sure to rest between bouts of activity.

·         Remember the weather. In cold weather, wear layers you can easily peel off. In hot weather, try exercising during cooler hours or in an air-conditioned gym.  Watch for signs of overheating such as headache, dizziness, nausea, faintness, cramps, or palpitations.  No matter the temperature, always drink lots of water!

·         Use good form. Especially for strength training, good form is critical to success. Initially use no weight or very light weights when learning the exercises. And never sacrifice good form by hurrying to finish reps or sets, or struggling to lift heavier weights.

 

Finally, if you have persistent or intense muscle pain that starts during a workout or right afterward, or muscle soreness that persists more than one to two weeks, call your doctor for advice.

 

References

https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/10-tips-for-exercising-safely

http://healthlibrary.epnet.com/PamphletPrint.aspx?token=13017087-e182-44a8-b26a-0bd8976976b3&chunkiid=21333#