Skip navigation
All Places > Member Support > Using Your Insurance > Blog

Based on your feedback, we’ve made updates to our website to make it easier to use.  

New and improved features

Account highlights. Find quick links to view your orders and add new prescriptions, plus messages personalized for you.

Alerts. Quickly see if there’s an action you need to take, such as updating your order information, address or payment method.

Improved prescription view. Medication names are now larger and easier to read, alongside an image of your pills. Plus, it’s easier to see which of your prescriptions are ready for a refill.

 

Watch this short video to see the new features in action.

Ready to take it for a spin? Sign in to your new dashboard now.

If you play football, September is the most likely time you'll end up in the emergency room with an injury from the sport.

In February, the odds of you landing in the ER with a sprained ankle from a game of pick-up isn't as likely.

Looking at data from the 2014 US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System — and the mesmerizing visual compiled by FlowingData — we decided to map out the wackiest things that sent an abnormal number of people to the emergency room every month. We also compared those spikes to the number of ER visits that related to each activity over the rest of the year.

 

Check out this link for more information- http://www.businessinsider.com/unusual-events-that-send-people-to-the-emergency-room-2016-7/#january-snowboarding-landed-more-people-in-the-hospital-in-january-with-virtually-no-accidents-during-the-summer-months-in-the-us-for-obvious-reasons-1

Get the facts

When medical emergencies come up, it can be hard to know what to do. Should you try to reach your doctor or head to the emergency room? Emergency room waits can be long – the sickest patients are the first to get treatment. You may find quicker care at medical settings such as urgent care centers, walk-in doctor’s offices, or walk-in retail clinics. These accredited facilities are staffed with doctors, nurses, and physician’s assistants and are typically open evenings, weekends and on some holidays. You’ll not only get high-quality care, you’ll pay far less than you would for an emergency room visit deemed medically unnecessary. Some insurers provide a Nurse Hotline to help determine the best course of action.It’s always a good idea to plan ahead, so be sure to check which local facilities are in your insurer’s network

 

Where should you go?

Urgent Care Centers: Staff doctors are on hand to treat conditions that are serious enough to require immediate medical attention, but don’t merit the ER. They can handle stitches and sprains, animal bites, and do x-rays and lab work (e.g. testing for strep).Walk-in Doctor’s Offices: You usually don’t need to be a patient to see a physician and no appointment is needed. These are good alternatives for common conditions such as headaches, vomiting, and mild asthma attacks. Retail Health Clinics: Typically found in major pharmacies or retail stores, these clinics are staffed by healthcare professionals such as nurses and physician’s assistants. They treat everyday problems like sore throats and ear pain, minor cuts and rashes and provide preventive care, such as administering flu shots.

 

When should you go?

Emergency Room
  • Sudden loss of consciousness
  • Heart attack signs, such as severe chest pain
  • Stroke signs, such as numbness, sudden loss of vision and difficulty talking
  • Severe shortness of breath
  • Coughing up or vomiting blood
  • Cuts or wounds that won’t stop bleeding
  • Possible broken bones
  • Poisoning
  • Trauma to the head
  • Sudden, severe abdominal pain
  • Suicidal thoughts

Urgent Care Center, Walk-In Doctor's Office, or Retail Health Clinic

  • Animal bites
  • Stitches
  • X-ray
  • Lab work (e.g. testing for strep)
  • Back pain
  • Sprains
  • Mild asthma attack
  • Minor headache
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Vaccinations
  • Rashes
  • Minor bumps, cuts, scrapes
  • Minor fever, cold symptoms
  • Burning with urination
  • Cough, sore throat
  • Ear or sinus pain
  • Minor allergic reaction
  • Eye swelling, irritation, redness or pain

Sources

When to Call 911, Your Doctor, or the Hospital," University of Rochester Medical Center, (accessed 31 Jan. 2013)

Emergency Care vs. Urgent Care," FairHealthConsumer.org, (accessed 31 Jan. 2013)

Alternatives to Emergency Room Care," BCBS.com, (accessed 31 Jan. 2013)

 

Where To Go When You Have An Emergency - Medical Insurance Tips

Making a visit to the emergency room can be an expensive ordeal. Make sure you know what symptoms qualify you to visit a doctor, urgent care center, or the ER.

 

 

It’s important to know the most effective way to access care when you need it.

 

Is it an emergency?

“Approximately one-third of all emergency room visits are for non-emergency problems,” says Steve Lee, M.D., chief medical officer for Humana Senior Products in Florida. “It can be a costly and time-consuming way to access care.” On average, the cost of an entire ER visit exceeds $800.

So what is the best course of action when it comes to getting the doctor care you need when you need it?

 

What’s the best resource?

"Your primary care physician (PCP) is most knowledgeable and helpful when it comes to the coordination of your care,” explains Lee. “It’s very important to have a single doctor’s office that’s in the know and at the center of your healthcare."

A PCP provides your regular preventive care and screenings and works with any specialists to coordinate additional care. “Over time, they get to know you and can anticipate your health concerns,” says Lee.Some have physician assistants and advanced registered nurse practitioners as part of their practice. During those times when the PCP is unavailable, these people support the practice. “You shouldn’t be concerned if you’re directed to them, as they can provide quality care, write prescriptions, and usually work directly with your PCP to meet your overall healthcare needs,” says Lee. "Think of it as a team approach to your care."

Know Your Numbers

Place of treatment Avg. cost per visit only* 
Emergency room$800+
Urgent care center$108
Doctor's office$78
Retail Clinic$55*

 

*excluding additional tests, procedures, or medications

 

Urgent Care Facilities

When it comes to after-hours care, urgent care facilities – or walk-in clinics – are cost-efficient alternatives to emergency rooms. "If your PCP is not on call for after-hours care, he or she will have a covering physician responding to your call," says Lee. "They can provide advice and let you know whether you should visit an urgent care facility or whether something can wait to be managed until the following office day."

Remember that emergency rooms are for treating life-threatening situations. Save these visits for things like broken bones, chest pain, or difficulty breathing. Consider an urgent care facility when you need to see a doctor and your PCP office is unavailable

 

What you should do

Whether you visit an urgent care facility or an emergency room, there are a few things you should always remember to do:

  • If time permits, call your PCP’s office first
  • Take your PCP’s name and telephone number, including fax number, with you
  • Take all your medications – or a copy of your latest medical records – with you
  • Call your PCP’s office the next business day so they can follow up
  • Ask for a copy of your complete medical record of the visit (all tests, lab results, and discharge recommendations) and take them with you the next time you see your PCP
  • If possible, ask a friend or family member to accompany you (especially important for visits to the emergency room)

 

Don't know which step to take? Call HumanaFirst®

If you have questions about symptoms you’re experiencing, the HumanaFirst 24-hour Nurse Advice Line is available – for free – to most Humana members. Nurses on the other end of the line can answer your questions, assess your symptoms, make referrals to emergency room or urgent care facilities, or help you find a PCP in your area.

 

Call 1 - 800 - 622 - 9529

24 hours a day, seven days a week

This information was originally published in the Summer 2009 HAO Magazine.

 

 

https://www.humana.com/learning-center/health-and-wellbeing/healthy-living/er

Would you like to take better care of yourself and your health? One simple way is to start taking better care of your eyes. Healthy eyes are an important part of living a healthy and full life. And by taking steps to improve your sight and protect your eyes from harm, you have a great chance of seeing and living well for many years.

 

The National Eye Institute offers these simple tips to help you keep your eyes healthy and happy. You may be doing some of them already, but the more you do, the better off your eyes will be.

 

Get regular eye checkups

Seeing an eye doctor once a year is maybe the most important thing you can do for your eyes and your general health. These checkups can let you know about vision problems you may have and help you fix them with glasses or contact lenses. Having clear vision can improve your quality of life, And it can also help you avoid headaches and other eye-related health problems.

 

Your eye doctor will also look for signs of eye disease, such as glaucoma, that may have no symptoms. Finding such eye diseases early enough can help prevent more problems and even blindness.

 

Just as important, according to allaboutvision.com, "your eye doctor may be able to tell you if you are developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol or other problems." Finding these things out early can give your regular doctor a better chance of treating the condition.

 

Know your family's eye health history

Knowing if someone in your family has had eye disease of any kind can help your doctor know what to look for during checkups.

 

Eat right

Eating fruits and vegetables is good for your eyes, as well as your body. A study found in Archives of Ophthalmology (2007; 125(9): 1225–1232) finds that eating fruits and "dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale, or collard greens" is important for keeping your eyes healthy. The National Eye Institute also says that fish such as salmon, tuna, and halibut can be good for your eyes.

 

Manage your weight

Being overweight puts you at greater risk of getting diabetes. And with diabetes comes a greater risk of developing serious eye problems. If you need help losing weight, talk to your doctor today.

 

Wear safety glasses

Eye problems aren't just caused by disease. Every day, across the country, thousands of people of all ages hurt their eyes at home and at work. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that "each day, about 2,000 U.S. workers have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment." And according to Prevent Blindness America®, "accidents involving common household products cause 125,000 eye injuries each year." The good news? As many as 90 percent of these injuries could be prevented by wearing safety glasses, safety goggles, or face shields. So make sure to wear something to protect your eyes when you play sports or work with tools or chemicals.

 

Quit smoking, or, better yet - don't start Smoking is not only bad for your general health, but it is also bad for your eyes. Studies, including a report from the Surgeon General of the United States, have found that smoking can lead to eye disease.

 

Wear sunglasses UV rays from the sun can damage your eyes and lead to diseases that can cause blindness. So always wear sunglasses when outside. And remember, sunglasses aren't just for summer. Wear them in the winter to block harmful glare from ice and snow. When choosing sunglasses, find a pair that blocks 99 to 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B rays.

 

Give your eyes a rest

When working on a computer for long periods of time, you should take breaks to reduce strain on your eyes. The National Eye Institute says to follow the "20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, look away about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds."

 

Keep your contacts, and your hands, clean

If you wear contact lenses, make sure you wash your hands before putting them in or taking them out. Also, be sure to clean your contacts as directed. Replace them as often as your doctor says. Following these simple steps can help protect your eyes from infections.

 

Now that you know some ways you can care for the health of your own eyes, you should also know that you can do things to protect the eyes of children.

 

Just as for adults, it's very important for children to have regular eye checkups. According to the American Optometric Association (AOA), infants should have their first full eye checkup at 6 months of age. Children should then have another eye exam at age 3, and just before they enter the first grade, at about age 5 or 6.

 

For school-aged children, the AOA recommends a checkup every two years if no vision correction is needed. Children who need glasses or contact lenses should be checked once a year or as directed by their eye doctor.

 

You can also take the following steps to help protect your child's eyes from harm around your house:

  • Check for sharp corners on furniture or other items and either remove the items or cover the sharp edges.
  • Make sure toys in the house are right for your child's age, keeping toys with sharp edges and shooting parts away from any young children.
  • Have your child wash his or her hands often to help avoid illness and eye infections.

 

If you take care of your eyes, your eyes will take care of you. And by following some or all of these tips, you will have a great chance of having happy, healthy eyes for life!

Making a visit to the emergency room can be an expensive ordeal. Make sure you know what symptoms qualify you to visit a doctor, urgent care center, or the ER.

 

It’s important to know the most effective way to access care when you need it.

 

Is it an emergency?

“Approximately one-third of all emergency room visits are for non-emergency problems,” says Steve Lee, M.D., chief medical officer for Humana Senior Products in Florida. “It can be a costly and time-consuming way to access care.” On average, the cost of an entire ER visit exceeds $800.

So what is the best course of action when it comes to getting the doctor care you need when you need it?

What’s the best resource?

"Your primary care physician (PCP) is most knowledgeable and helpful when it comes to the coordination of your care,” explains Lee. “It’s very important to have a single doctor’s office that’s in the know and at the center of your healthcare."

A PCP provides your regular preventive care and screenings and works with any specialists to coordinate additional care. “Over time, they get to know you and can anticipate your health concerns,” says Lee.Some have physician assistants and advanced registered nurse practitioners as part of their practice. During those times when the PCP is unavailable, these people support the practice. “You shouldn’t be concerned if you’re directed to them, as they can provide quality care, write prescriptions, and usually work directly with your PCP to meet your overall healthcare needs,” says Lee. "Think of it as a team approach to your care."

 

 

Know Your Numbers

Place of treatmentAvg. cost per visit only*
Emergency room$800+
Urgent care center$108
Doctor's office$78
Retail Clinic$55*

 

*excluding additional tests, procedures, or medications

 

Urgent Care Facilities

When it comes to after-hours care, urgent care facilities – or walk-in clinics – are cost-efficient alternatives to emergency rooms. "If your PCP is not on call for after-hours care, he or she will have a covering physician responding to your call," says Lee. "They can provide advice and let you know whether you should visit an urgent care facility or whether something can wait to be managed until the following office day."

Remember that emergency rooms are for treating life-threatening situations. Save these visits for things like broken bones, chest pain, or difficulty breathing. Consider an urgent care facility when you need to see a doctor and your PCP office is unavailable

 

 

What you should do

Whether you visit an urgent care facility or an emergency room, there are a few things you should always remember to do:

  • If time permits, call your PCP’s office first
  • Take your PCP’s name and telephone number, including fax number, with you
  • Take all your medications – or a copy of your latest medical records – with you
  • Call your PCP’s office the next business day so they can follow up
  • Ask for a copy of your complete medical record of the visit (all tests, lab results, and discharge recommendations) and take them with you the next time you see your PCP
  • If possible, ask a friend or family member to accompany you (especially important for visits to the emergency room)

 

You can also check out our Doctor on Demand service:

 

Telemedicine - Doctor on Demand 

 

Doctor on Demand - See a doctor from the comfort of your home